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Report of the Grouville Parish Climate Emergency Action Working Group

Updated: Sep 4, 2023


1 Foreward


“It’s inspiring to see how organised the Grouville Parish Climate Emergency Action Working Group are, and how much they have achieved in such a short space of time. What’s particularly impressive is the way they have sought to engage the energy of the whole community, drawing ideas from many different sources, and yet managing to maintain a coherent framework for their action plan. It is encouraging to see that whenever people are given the opportunity to engage in the struggle against climate change, there is never a shortage of energy, passion or commitment. I hope that the different parishes can draw strength from each other, and perhaps “ratchet up” both the quality and quantity of good ideas as a result. Certainly, the work that Grouville has already done will help us in St Brelade.”

Jonathan Renouf, former Executive Producer in the BBC Science department, who has been making documentaries about climate change for 20 years.


2 Executive Summary


2.1 On 10th July a ‘Climate Change Emergency’ proposition was presented to and approved by the Grouville Parish Assembly. Scientific evidence from the IPCC clearly shows that the planet is heading towards a 6th mass extinction event, and every member of the global society needs to take action to achieve a 1.5 degree Celsius pathway through carbon neutrality by 2025-2030. This requires action to be taken now. See Appendix A for the full proposition.



Figure 1 - 6th Mass Extinction Event Causes

2.2 The proposition required our Constable John Le Maistre to prepare a plan outlining how carbon neutrality will be achieved in both the municipality and in the parish community by individuals and businesses. This plan was required to be completed and approved at Parish Assembly by 31st December 2019.


2.3 The Grouville proposition followed on from Project 02/2019 that Deputy Rob Ward took to the Parish of St Helier on March 27th 2019, and P27 that the States Assembly approved on 2nd May 2019. St Brelade commenced their climate emergency project on 16th July, and it is anticipated that both St Saviour and St Clement will establish climate emergency action working groups. On 6th November, Sarah Howard was invited to attend the St Brelade climate emergency group who have agreed to build upon this report. It is clear that Constables Collaboration projects (see section 5.3.3 of the report) are a key enabler to a bottom up approach which both reflects the voice of the community whilst also facilitating individual behavioural change.


2.4 Aether UK have been commissioned by Growth Housing and Environment to calculate the Island’s carbon footprint. The parish action working group have utilised this analysis to estimate a target carbon reduction of 2.80 kilo tonnes of carbon emissions for 2020 and 16.80 kilo tonnes over the next 6 years to achieve carbon neutrality in the parish. It should be noted that we do not know the change in the Island’s carbon footprint since 2017. Also, achievement of this reduction is dependent upon policy support from the Government of Jersey (GOJ) and all parishes, businesses and islanders working toward their own carbon footprint reduction.


Figure 2 Jersey's Carbon Footprint 2017 https://www.aether-uk.com/Resources/Jersey-Infographic


It should be noted that the graph above only incorporates scope 1 emissions, which means it excludes emissions from French electricity supply (scope 2 emissions) and carbon emissions from imported goods (scope 3 emissions). See section 5.3.6 of the report for more detail.


2.5 The pie chart indicates that transport, defined by Aether[1] as aviation, road and other, represents 51% of total Island carbon emissions. This must be a priority focus for Grouville in 2020. The parish should also prioritise business (Commercial, air conditioning, refrigeration and other) and residential (domestic and other) emissions. Waste Management represents carbon emissions from wastewater treatment which the Parish cannot influence, and therefore that been excluded from the Grouville carbon footprint estimates.


2.6 An action working group was established following the proposition and had 7 meetings between August and December. The group was made up of the parish Constable, Deputy and self-elected members with an interest from the community; a people’s assembly, reflecting the voice of the Grouville community. See section 4 of the report for more detail.


2.7 This report becomes the first Climate Emergency Implementation Plan to achieve carbon neutrality in Grouville targeting 2.80 kilo tonnes of carbon emissions for 2020. It comprises 4 climate emergency pillars – Quick wins, Education Programme, Constables Collaborations and Report Recommendations - with 27 projects and 23 report recommendations. This is only the beginning of an ongoing carbon planning and reduction planning cycle to ensure carbon neutrality is met and a 1.5-degree Celsius pathway achieved to secure a future for our children and grandchildren.


Figure 3 - Four Pillars & their definition


2.7.1 The table below (Figure 4 - Estimated carbon emission reduction by Grouville Project) identifies the projects that are anticipated to impact the carbon footprint for the Parish of Grouville. Key projects that are likely to show a big impact on carbon reduction are:

  • Green Lanes Network – Constables Collaboration Pillar.

  • Raise awareness of existing cycle paths in the parish and encourage their use, e.g. walk to school, walk to the shops & take a walk in nature – Education Programme Pillar.

  • The current Jersey carbon footprint problem related to transportation, potential solutions and how it will impact the parish community – Education Programme Pillar.

  • Circulating the carbon footprint of local businesses to parishioners for informed buying decisions - Education Programme Pillar.

  • How to calculate your carbon footprint & compare it to global footprint recommendations.


2.7.2 To put this carbon emission reduction into Grouville parishioner perspective, this represents 3.4 tonnes per parishioner over 6 years or 0.6 tonnes per annum. In terms of car transport this equals 3,000 miles per annum in a post 2015 petrol small car[2], similar to a Ford Ka.


Figure 4 - Estimated carbon emission reduction by Grouville Project


2.8 The aim of the Grouville proposition was to reflect the voice of the local community, reflective of all age groups, but most importantly the younger generation who will have to live with the consequences of decisions and actions taken today. This plan must be mirrored in policy decisions made at a States Assembly level to address the climate emergency and it is incumbent on our States member representatives – our Constables, Deputies and Senators - to reflect the voice of the community in their States Assembly voting.


2.9 Carbon accounting is at the very earliest stages of development, but it must evolve quickly to respond to the needs of the global climate crisis. The GoJ must encourage local businesses to disclose their carbon footprint and encourage individuals to calculate their own carbon footprint which will result in the largest behavioural changes. See section 5.3.5 of the report for further details.


2.10 Grouville will launch their Education programme in the Spring with an Environmental Grouville event on 21st March, 2020. Ongoing education will be implemented through social media channels, BBC Radio Jersey, JEP, Grouville Gazette, Environmental Grouville website.


2.11 The 5 Constables Collaboration topics should be discussed and evaluated through peoples assemblies, where each Constable calls a representative group of parishioners to discuss and make recommendations which represent the voice of the community; as has been done in the preparation of this report.


2.12 The quick wins projects will continue to be implemented by project leads. See Appendix E for Project Initiation Documents (PIDs).


2.13 The next steps in relation to implementation are listed in section 6.


2.14 The GoJ have issued a number of reports which reference or impact our climate emergency, with a Carbon Neutral Strategy due by Dec 2019:

  • Tackling the Climate Emergency – Initial report issued July 2019,

  • Sustainable Transport Policy

  • Eco Active Pathway 2050

  • Island Plan 2021-2030

  • Shoreline Management Plan

  • South West of St Helier Masterplan

  • Government Plan 2020-2023

It is vital that the carbon neutral strategy is joined up with all other government strategy and policy developments, and that they align with the demands of the community; particularly our younger people who are represented, as a first steppingstone, in this report


2.15 Jersey has a small population of just over 100,000, which makes it statistically significant as a climate change testbed. The Island also holds a history of innovation, adapting to the needs of the global economy. Through this report, produced as a result of the action working groups in Grouville, we have launched the possibility of a coalition of parishes committed to developing bottom up climate plans that represent the voice of the whole community, implementing change and working to achieve net zero emissions by 2025-2030. In this way, we are demonstrating democracy in action. This supports our Government and its elected leaders in taking the difficult decisions that are necessary to achieve a 1.5 degree Celsius pathway and shine the light on Jersey as a vanguard for climate change.


3 Background


3.1 At a Parish Assembly on 10th July 2019, a ‘Climate Change Emergency’ proposition was presented to and approved by the Parish Assembly. The proposition reads: “to agree, as proposed by Sarah Howard, Parishioner of Grouville, that the Parish of Grouville should declare a climate change emergency and aim to be carbon-neutral by 2025-2030. That the Constable be requested to draw up a plan to achieve this for presentation to the Parish Assembly by the end of 2019. To endorse the proposition of Sarah Howard and to request the Constable to advise the Parish Deputy and Senators of the decision of the Parish Assembly.”


3.2 In addition to the approval of the Project, the minutes of the Assembly record that the Constable intended to set up an action working group whose role would be to draw up a plan for presentation to a Parish Assembly before the end of 2019, and to establish baseline data in respect of the Grouville Municipality carbon footprint.


3.3 The scope of the plan fell into two parts:

3.3.1 to consider and identify how the activities and services provided by the Parish can aim to become carbon-neutral by 2025-2030.

3.3.2 To consider and identify how the Parish of Grouville can influence, educate and encourage those that work, visit and live in the Parish to also become carbon neutral by 2025-2030.


3.4 The purpose of the action working group was to oversee the development and output of the objectives of the Climate Emergency Proposition to:

3.4.1 Guide and oversee the development, preparation and presentation of a plan that sets out how the parish can aim to become carbon-neutral by 2025-2030.

3.4.2 To take urgent steps to inform all parishioners and businesses in Grouville about the severity of the crisis.

3.4.3 To take urgent action to mobilise and support all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create “the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and islanders support each other to change their behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible but no later than 2025-2030.”

3.4.4 Oversee work to establish Grouville Municipality current carbon footprint.

3.4.5 Support the presentation of this information to Parish Assembly during 2019.

3.5 The action working group meetings were chaired by the Constable and his alternate, Procureur John Lamy. They were attended by the Parish Deputy and comprised self-nominated parishioners (see list of members in Appendix B) who wanted to contribute; in this way the group recognised itself as a Peoples Assembly. The proposition proposer, Sarah Howard, facilitated the action working group meetings. The Constable co-opted Jane Burns from Eco active to join the action working group.


3.6 The Terms of Reference charged the group with delivering a report divided into three key elements:

3.6.1 The current carbon footprint of Parish Municipality activities and services.

3.6.2 A programme of work that aims to deliver Parish activities and services with carbon neutrality by 2025-2030. This report is to include indicative implications, in terms of carbon footprint, finance, workforce, legal and existing policies.

3.6.3 The steps taken and proposed by the Parish to take urgent steps to inform, educate and mobilise support from all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create “the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and islanders support each other to change their behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible but no later than 2025-2030.”


4 Approach


4.1 The Parish Assembly requested that the Constable present the report by the end of 2019. To achieve this, the following meetings[3] were held:


4.1.1 19th August 2019: Preparatory Meeting attended by Constable John Le Maistre, Deputy Caroline Labey, Sarah Howard. At this meeting dates of action working group meetings and draft Terms of Reference (See Appendix C – Terms of Reference) were agreed. Additionally, 4 main themes for the third part of the final report - inform, educate and mobilise support from all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and Islanders support each other to change their behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible but no later than 2025-2030 – were identified, and more clearly defined in a Quick Wins Meeting on 30th September (see 3.1.3 below) as follows:


  • Quick Wins – projects that could be implemented quickly to start the change momentum.

  • Education Programme – to raise awareness of the climate emergency and encourage the Grouville community to change behaviours which reduces the carbon footprint in the parish.

  • Constables Collaborations – Themes which cross all parishes and require parishioner engagement to gauge the voice of the community for reflection in cross parish activity and Government of Jersey Policy.

  • Report Recommendations – Themes where the Constables have limited control over the issue and Government of Jersey policy is required.


4.1.2 16th September 2019: Action Working Group 1, attended by Procureur Lamy, Sarah Howard, self-nominated parishioners with an interest (see Appendix B), Jane Burns – Eco Active, and John Baker – POSH. This meeting agreed the final terms of reference (See Appendix C – Terms of Reference), established the working group, and agreed the projects using the output of POSH action working groups plus additional projects identified as important for the Grouville action working group. These 78 projects were grouped by each attendee into the 4 report themes, some overlapping, now referred to as “the 4 pillars”, and subdivided into the project topics identified by Environmental Grouville Facebook group as important in the run up to the proposition (See Appendix D – Action Working Group 1 Output).


4.1.3 30th September 2019: Quick Wins Meeting, attended by Procureur Lamy, Sarah Howard, self-nominated parishioners with an interest (see Appendix B), Jane Burns – Eco Active, and John Baker – POSH. At this meeting the 4 pillars criteria were determined (Figure 1 Four Pillars Definitions) which supported the refinement of the 21 action working group 1 quick wins projects (see Appendix D - Action Working Group 1 Output) and finalisation of the 12 Grouville Quick Wins Projects and project leads.



Figure 5 Four Pillars Definitions


4.1.4 7th October 2019: Action Working Group 2 attended by Constable John Le Maistre, Deputy Caroline Labey, Sarah Howard, self-nominated parishioners with an interest (see Appendix B), Jane Burns – Eco Active, John Baker – POSH, Andrew Le Quesne POSS. At this meeting Deputy Labey updated the group about her progress on cycle tracks and GoJ topics relevant to the Grouville Action Working Group. It was noted that Deputy Labey would be briefing the Comité des Connétables in December and that this linked to the Green Lanes Network project identified by the Grouville Climate Emergency Action Working Group within Constables Collaborations (see section 5.3.3). The meeting also had an update from each of the quick wins project leads, and a recommendation was made to the Constable by Mark Dawson that the Parish rates be increased to fund climate emergency initiatives.


4.1.5 23rd October 2019: Constables Smaller Working Group, attended by Constable John Le Maiste, Sarah Howard and James Howard to refine and finalise the original action working group 1 39 Climate Emergency Education and the 24 Constables Collaborations long list projects to 7 education themes (Figure 4 - Education Programme) and 5 Constables Collaboration topics (Figure 5 - Constables Collaborations Topics)


4.1.6 4th November 2019: Action Working Group 3, attended by Constable John Le Maistre, Deputy Caroline Labey, Sarah Howard, self-nominated parishioners with an interest (see Appendix B), Jane Burns – Eco Active. The meeting agreed that the final report needed to evaluate the impact that the Grouville projects would have on the parish carbon footprint. The group agreed in principle with the Grouville allocation of 5,000/105,500ths of the 2017 carbon footprint for the island, representing 4.7%.


Figure 6 below indicates that the Parish needs to take action to reduce 16.80 kilo tonnes of carbon emissions over the period 2020 to 2026, or an average reduction of 2.80 tonnes per annum, to become carbon neutral. The table also emphasises the key target area of Transport, defined by Aether[1] as aviation, road and other, which represents 51% of total Island carbon emissions. This must be a priority focus for Grouville in 2020. The Parish should also prioritise business (commercial, air conditioning, refrigeration and other) and residential emissions (domestic and other) emissions. Waste Management represents carbon emissions from wastewater treatment which the Parish of Grouville cannot influence, and therefore that has been excluded from the Grouville carbon footprint estimates.


Figure 6 - Estimated Carbon Emissions for Grouville

4.1.7 The group allocated each of the agreed projects against the 2017 carbon footprint that they believed it would impact. It should be noted that this may not be an accurate target because we do not know the change in the carbon footprint since 2017. Also, achievement of this reduction is dependent upon policy support from the Government of Jersey (GOJ) and all parishes, businesses and Islanders working toward their own carbon footprint reduction.


From this, the report recommendations for implementation by GoJ to support the success of the Grouville action plan implementation were evaluated.


At this meeting it was also decided to launch the Education programme in the Spring with an Environmental Grouville event on 21st March, 2020. Ongoing education will be implemented through social media channels, BBS radio Jersey, JEP, Grouville Gazette, Environmental Grouville website.


4.1.8 2nd December 2019: Action Working Group 4, attended by Constable John Le Maistre, Deputy Caroline Labey, Sarah Howard, self-nominated parishioners with an interest (see Appendix B), Jane Burns – Eco Active. The first draft of this report was presented. It was agreed that it could be finalised by email circulation.


5 Findings

This section of the report delivers the 3 outputs required by the proposition at paragraph 3.6 above


5.1 Current Carbon Footprint of Grouville Municipality

John Le Maistre insert

5.2 Programme of Work to Deliver Municipality Carbon Neutrality by 2025-2030

John Le Maistre insert

5.3 Steps taken and proposed by the parish to inform, educate and mobilise support from all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create bottom-up initiatives to change behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible, but no later than 2025-2030. The 7 Grouville Climate Emergency Action Working Group (GCEAWG) meetings have resulted in:


5.3.1 12 Quick wins projects with 8 projects having leads identified and project initiation documents (PIDs) prepared (see Appendix E – Project Initiation Documents)


Figure 7 - Quick Wins Projects


5.3.2 11 Education Programme Themes which will be launched at an Environmental Grouville event on 21st March 2020.


Figure 8 - Education Programme


5.3.3 4 Constables Collaborations topics to be progressed by the Commité des Connétables

Figure 9 - Constables Collaborations Topics


It is recommended that peoples assemblies are convened, where each Constable calls a representative group of parishioners to discuss and make recommendations representing the voice of the Island wide community; as has been done in the preparation of this report. People’s assemblies should not be confused with citizen’s assemblies which are a central government tool to evaluate policy making via a jury service type assembly of individuals selected randomly through the population. The members of the citizens assembly hear evidence from expert witnesses covering the topics that government want the citizens assembly to decide upon.



Figure 10 - Indicative Governance for the Climate Emergency, Bottom up and Top Down


5.3.4 The Grouville group has identified 23 Report Recommendations. The recommendations require GoJ policy to enforce behavioural changes which achieve carbon neutrality.


Report recommendations

5.3.5 To be able to evaluate the success of the implementation of the projects a first, very high level, estimate of the carbon emissions of the parish was derived, based upon a population of 5,000 residents. It is anticipated that over time, calculation of a more accurate carbon footprint for the parish will emerge as carbon accounting becomes embedded globally.


Carbon accounting is pivotal in the reduction of global emissions. In October 2018 the UK Government approved The Companies (Directors’ Report) and Limited Liability Partnerships (Energy and Carbon Report) Regulations 2018, introducing new carbon and energy reporting requirements for quoted companies, large companies and large LLPs[4]. These regulations came into effect on 1st April 2019. Under the new rules, quoted companies are now required to report (within the directors’ report) on their global energy use in addition to the existing requirements for such companies to provide details of their greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, they will be required to disclose the proportion of emissions and energy consumed in the United Kingdom and offshore area, as well as describing any measures taken to enhance energy efficiency. Large unquoted companies and large LLPs will be required to provide information on their UK energy use, the associated greenhouse gas emissions relating to gas, electricity, and transport, an intensity ratio, and any energy efficiency measures taken. Overseas emissions and energy consumption are excluded from these requirements. For companies this information will be included in the directors’ report, and for LLPs, in a ‘carbon and energy report’ which will form part of the annual report. LLPs will also be required to include a list of their members within the new carbon and energy report.


Carbon accounting is at the very earliest stages of development, but it must evolve quickly to respond to the needs of the global climate crisis. The GoJ must encourage local businesses to disclose their carbon footprint and encourage individuals to calculate their own carbon footprint which will result in the largest behavioural changes.


5.3.6 Definitions of scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions are very important to understand in relation to the carbon footprint of the Island of Jersey. As a signatory of the Kyoto Protocol the GoJ reports on Scope 1 emissions as an island. Jersey emitted 365,581 tonnes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere in 2017, which is equivalent to 3.5 tonnes per person (based on population of 105,500 in 2017). The GoJ does not currently report scope 2 or 3 emissions. It is important to note that carbon emissions are expressed as tCO2e. The Island needs to become greenhouse gas neutral, presented as kilotonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent.


Scope 1 - Direct greenhouse gas emissions are those generated on Island and reflected in the Aether data.

Scope 2 - Greenhouse gas emissions are those from purchased French contract electricity supplied to GoJ, municipality, businesses and Islanders. These emissions are accounted for by the country that generates the electricity (France). It is important to note that the proportion and amount of our carbon emissions that are accounted for in French Scope 1 emissions will increase as we transition to, and increase, electricity use.

Scope 3 – Indirect greenhouse gas emissions are those associated with the manufacture and transport of the goods and services we consume but that occur at sources owned or controlled by another country. This includes full life cycle emissions throughout the supply chain, including those associated with end of life recycling and/or disposal. Scope 3 emissions are driven by the choices and behaviours, but are accounted for as Scope 1 emissions in the country in which the emissions were generated. These are very difficult to measure on a parish or Island wide basis. Examples might include the energy that was used to manufacture your PC in China, the burning of marine diesel to ship a pack of tomatoes from Spain to Jersey, or the aviation fuel consumed on your flight from Gatwick to Italy.

The projects identified by Grouville will impact scope 1, 2 & 3 emissions, but currently we can only evaluate their impact on scope 1 emissions.


5.3.7 Figure 11 below identifies the projects that are anticipated to impact the carbon footprint for the Parish of Grouville. Key projects that are likely to show a big impact on carbon reduction are:

  • Green Lanes Network – Constables Collaboration Pillar.

  • Raise awareness of existing cycle paths in the parish and encourage their use, e.g. walk to school, walk to the shops and take a walk in nature – Education Programme Pillar.

  • The current Jersey carbon footprint problem related to transportation, potential solutions and how it will impact the parish community – Education Programme Pillar.

  • Circulating the carbon footprint of local businesses to parishioners for informed buying decisions - Education Programme Pillar.

  • How to calculate your carbon footprint and compare it to global footprint recommendations.


Figure 11 - Grouville Projects by Aether Sector


5.3.8 To put this carbon emission reduction into parishioner perspective, this represents 3.4 tonnes per parishioner over 6 years or 0.6 tonnes per annum. In terms of car transport this equals 3,000 miles per annum in a post 2015 petrol small car[5], similar to a Ford Ka.


6 Next Steps


6.1 Constable John Le Maistre to present the report to the Grouville Parish Assembly on ……


6.2 The Constable and Deputy to implement the 4 pillars projects and work with the GoJ to implement policy to support the recommendations and other behaviour changes of all Islanders.


6.3 The Constable and Deputy to reflect the voice of the Grouville community presented in this report in the States Assembly and at Comite des Connetables meetings.


6.4 The remaining 4 Quick Wins Projects without PIDs or leads should be advertised in the next edition of the Grouville Gazette, on the Environmental Grouville website and the Environmental Grouville Facebook page, calling for parishioners to develop and lead the implementation of the project.


6.5 Skills required to implement projects identified in PIDs should be advertised in the next edition of the Grouville Gazette, on the Environmental Grouville website and the Environmental Grouville Facebook page, calling for parishioners with those skills to contact project leads directly.


6.6 Project leads should link in voluntary, community and charitable organisations who already provide elements of the skills required to fulfil elements of projects. In this way the Grouville Climate Emergency programmes link up to Island wide provision, and do not attempt to re-provide services already in existence.


6.7 A project lead, date and location need to be determined for the Environmental Grouville Climate Emergency event to launch the education programme on 21st March 2020.


6.8 Constable John Le Maistre and Deputy Caroline Labey take forward the report recommendations to the States Chamber or any other political forums where the subject matter is discussed, and represent the voice of the Grouville community in the development of relevant policy.


6.9 This report is merely the start of an ongoing cycle of planning, implementation and review which should take place annually. In this way, the pillars, projects and their implementation can be reviewed, adjusted and augmented to ensure achievement of carbon neutrality by 2025-2030 in the Parish of Grouville.




Footnotes:


[3] All meeting agendas and minutes can be found on the Environmental Grouville website




Appendices



Appendix A – The Proposition

PROPOSITION

THE PARISHIONERS are asked to take into consideration and if deemed advisable:

to agree, as proposed by Sarah Howard, Parishioner of Grouville, that the Parish of Grouville should declare a climate change emergency and aim to be carbon-neutral by 2025. That the Constable be requested to draw up a plan to achieve this for presentation to the Parish Assembly by the end of 2019. To endorse the proposition of Sarah Howard and to request the Constable to advise the Parish Deputies and Senators of the decision of the Parish Assembly.

REPORT

Climate change should be considered the greatest long-term threat to our way of life, our future security and well-being.

Current action to combat the emissions of greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide and methane, and to ultimately fight anthropomorphic driven climate change, are based around the Paris Agreement (https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement).

It has reached the point where, to achieve the goals set out during the Paris Agreement (i.e. “holding the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels”), we need to make a specific response.

The Paris Agreement was the best outcome that could be negotiated amongst all the nations of the world in a context where there is not yet a general understanding that an emergency response is possible. By definition the Paris Agreement, arising from a consensus of all the world’s governments, could not represent a leading-edge position, not least because it had to be signed off by countries that earn major export income from fossil fuels (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Australia). However one of the big achievements of the Paris Agreement was recognition, at last, that a +2°C temperature cap is not safe and not acceptable.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, published in October 2018, describes the enormous harm that a 2°C rise is likely to cause, compared with a 1.5°C rise, and confirms that limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C may still be possible. However, this is entirely dependent on ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities and others. (https://www.ipcc.ch/2018/10/08/summary-for-policymakers-of-ipcc-special-report-on-global-warming-of-15c-approved-by-governments/)



This makes clear that the Paris Agreement’s best case temperature cap of +1.5°C will not:

  1. prevent the Pacific and Indian Ocean atoll nations from being permanently flooded;

  2. prevent permanent flooding of low-lying, heavily populated areas (Bangladesh, Vietnam, China, Egypt, etc. where over 100 million people live);

  3. prevent the destruction of coral reefs around the world, including the Great Barrier Reef;

  4. prevent the mobilisation of the huge carbon stores in the Arctic (which will cause the release of CO2 and methane that could exceed the emissions from all fossil fuels so far);

  5. provide food security; and provide a foundation for military security and positive peace. The impact on Jersey as a small island, and St Helier as its largest populated area, will be significant, long lasting, and life changing.

A report from January 2018 outlines some of the major risks to Jersey: https://www.gov.je/SiteCollectionDocuments/Government%20and%20administration/R%20Analy sis%20of%20Future%20Jersey%20indicators%20that%20are%20at%20high%20risk%20from%20 climate%20change%2020180323%20DM.pdf I will not list the risks as the report itself goes into them in detail. What would this proposition achieve?

This proposition would change the focus of the Parish of Grouville by including the issue of climate change onto the agenda of Parish meetings and into the process of producing the Parish plans. This will mean climate change impact is an integral feature of policy making. The targets set are not a ceiling to what we can achieve. Indeed, they are achievable and a key starting point for future actions. With a defined focus from the Parish of Grouville we have the opportunity to demonstrate to our population that we can take action for the future good of all Islanders. Our young people certainly need this assurance.

By our recognition of climate change as an emergency, we add our name to an ever-growing list of forward thinking jurisdictions that lead the way in climate action. The value of passing a specific proposition for delivering climate action is that it goes beyond business - as-usual and reform-as-usual. Special features of this mode are:

  1. a very strong focus on the issue;

  2. a strong priority for action and budgets relating to the issue;

  3. delivery of solutions as a package (rather than piecemeal, incremental change);

  4. delivery of solutions in a strong enough way to address future situations;

  5. delivery of temporary protection and adaptation measures while prevention and restorative measures are put in place and while they achieve their full effect This proposition enables policy makers to have climate change included as a key factor in their planning. It is time for us as a community, a parochial government and as citizens of the planet to have this consideration at the front and centre of our decision making. The legacy we leave for our children and beyond should be the measure of the success of the period of this parish.

The Parish of St Helier passed Project 02/2019 on 27th March 2019, aiming to be carbon neutral by 2025-2030. The Parish of St Helier have already held 2 Climate Change Working Group meetings, with the aim of having a plan for presentation before the end of 2019.



The Government of Jersey passed proposition P27 declaring a climate emergency on 2nd May 2019 with a commitment to carbon neutrality by 2030. The Government of Jersey are preparing to launch a consultation for a new Island Plan to be presented to the States in 2021. The outcome of the Parish of Grouville Climate Change Working Group meetings would represent the voice of Grouville Parishioners and must be form part of the working documents, along with all other parishes, in drawing together a government policy for the Island of Jersey to achieve carbon neutrality by 2025.

List of parishes in Jersey declaring a climate emergency:

● Parish of St Helier (Carbon neutral by 2025 – 2030)

List of councils declaring climate emergency (Principal) councils which have already passed motions declaring a Climate Emergency:

● Government of Jersey (Carbon neutral by 2030)

● Bradford Metropolitan District Council - (90% reduction in carbon emissions compared to

● 2005 levels by 2030)

● Brighton Hove City Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Bristol City Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Calderdale (no fixed target date)

● Cambridge City Council (no new target date, campaign continues to press for a more ambitious target)

● Carmarthenshire (zero carbon by 2030)

● Cheltenham (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Cornwall County Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Forest of Dean District Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Greater London Authority - (call for the Mayor to declare climate emergency)

● Hastings Borough Kirklees Metropolitan District Council - (carbon neutral in line with IPCC carbon targets)

● Lambeth Borough Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Lancaster City Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Leicester City Council - (carbon neutral by 2025-2030)

● Lewes D.C. Lewisham Borough Council

● Manchester City Council - (carbon neutral by 2038)

● Mendip District Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Milton Keynes - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● North Somerset Council (net zero carbon by 2030)

● Nottingham City Council - (carbon neutral by 2028)

● Oxford City Council - (carbon neutrality target TBC)

● Reading Borough Council - (to pursue zero carbon by 2030, but 'this date can only be achieved with substantial policy changes from national government'. - final motion on last 2 pages of meeting agenda)

● Reigate and Banstead B.C. Scarborough Borough Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Sheffield City Council - (carbon neutral asap)

● Somerset South Cambridgeshire Stroud District Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Trafford Council - (carbon neutrality target TBC)

● Wiltshire County Council

Parish and town councils :

● Alnwick Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Frome Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Glastonbury Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Ladock Parish Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Langport Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Machynlleth Town Council - (carbon neutral asap)

● Oswestry Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Stithians Parish Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Totnes Town Council - (carbon neutral by 2030)

● Tywyn Town Council - (carbon neutral as soon as possible)


More cities and Governments declaring a climate emergency can be found here:

https://www.theclimatemobilization.org/city-by-city Useful References https://www.campaigncc.org/climateemergency.shtml https://climateemergencydeclaration.org/ https://royalsociety.org/topics-policy/projects/climate-change-evidence-causes/basics-of-climatechange/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAn4PkBRCDARIsAGHmH3cDWl29STgE8KzaXlxEAsQjojxlsMooFZ2d8sUeHJlBiWXe24ZMjQaArCQEALw_wcB https://www.gov.je/SiteCollectionDocuments/Government%20and%20administration/R%20Turnin g%20Point%20Report%20Contents%20and%20Chapter%201%20(size%201.5mb)%2020140822% 20DM.pdf

Financial and WoManpower impact of proposition.

The financial cost of this proposition is difficult to detail. Both in terms of pre empting the contents of the Parish plans, and future policy. However, we have to consider the significant possible cost, both in financial and societal terms, of not taking this action. Staff time will be required but this can be minimised by including the consideration of climate change throughout the planning process.

Sarah Howard, Parishioner of Grouville






Appendix B – Participating Parishioners


Grouville Parishioner:

Sarah Howard

Jane Simpson

Tom Coles

Arie Uittenbogaard

Susan de la Mare

Lindsay Robbins

Stephen Robbins

Nina Morgan

Michele Leerson

Derek Howard

Julie Wildbore-Hands

Mark Dawson

Gillian Samson

Tina Risebrow

James Howard

Jo Forrest

Christine Garnier

Simon Harrison

Susan Taylor

Robin Hart




Appendix C – Terms of Reference


1. Set Up and Authority


This document sets out the governance around the establishment and operation of a working group to develop a plan, which sets out how the Parish can become Carbon Neutral.

The authority of this group comes from the Constable, who has been charged by a Parish Assembly with producing and presenting this plan back to an Assembly by the end of 2019.

2. Background


At a Parish Assembly on 10th July 2019, Sarah Howard, Parishioner, presented a ‘Climate Change Emergency’. The Assembly approved the Proposition reads: “to agree, as proposed by Sarah Howard, Parishioner of Grouville, that the Parish of Grouville should declare a climate change emergency, and aim to be carbon-neutral by 2025-2030. That the Constable be requested to draw up a plan to achieve this for presentation to the Parish Assembly by the end of 2019. To endorse the proposition of Sarah Howard and to request the Constable to advise the Parish Deputy and Senators of the decision of the Parish Assembly.


In addition to the approval of the Project, the minutes of the Assembly record that the Constable intended to set up a Working Party whose role will be to draw up a plan for presentation to a Parish Assembly before the end of 2019 and to establish baseline data in respect of the Grouville municipality carbon footprint.


This document sets out the Terms of Reference for the Working Group.

3. Purpose


The purpose of the working group is to oversee the development and output of the objectives of the Climate Emergency Proposition:

  1. Guide and oversee the development, preparation and presentation of a plan that sets out how the Parish can aim to become carbon-neutral by 2025-2030.

  2. To take urgent steps to inform all parishioners and businesses in Grouville about the severity of the crisis.

  3. To take urgent action to mobilise and support all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create “the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and Islanders support each other to change their behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible but no later than 2025-2030.”

  4. Oversee work to establish Grouville municipality current carbon footprint.

  5. Support the presentation of this information to Parish Assembly during 2019

4. Scope


The scope of this project is captured in two elements:

  1. to consider and identify how the activities and services provided by the Parish can aim to become carbon-neutral by 2025-2030.

  2. To consider and identify how the Parish can influence, educate and encourage those that work, visit and live in the Parish to also become carbon neutral by 2025-2030.

5. Objectives


The objectives of the project are:

  1. Identify, as far as reasonably practicable, and document the current carbon footprint of Parish municipality activities and services. It is not intended to establish an indicative carbon footprint for the Parish as a whole.

  2. To take urgent steps to inform all parishioners and businesses in Grouville about the severity of the crisis.

  3. To take urgent action to mobilise and support all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create “the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and Islanders support each other to change their behaviours and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible but no later than 2025-2030.

  4. Produce a plan that sets out a programme of work that aims to deliver Parish activities and services with carbon neutrality by 2025-2030.

6. Membership


The Group will be chaired by the Constable, attended by the Parish Deputy and comprise self- nominated parishioners who wish to contribute to the project.

The Constable may co-opt others to join the Working Group as appropriate. The Constable can appoint an alternative in the event that he is unable to attend a meeting.

The Group may invite experts to attend to provide assistance to their discussions.

The proposition proposer, Sarah Howard, will attend meetings and facilitate the group.

The Parish Secretary will attend meetings and document the Group’s plan.

The Parish Secretary and other Parish staff, as required, will support the work of the Group, providing research, reports and advice.

7. Deliverables


The Group is charged with delivering its objectives (a to d) in the format of three key documents:

  1. A report that sets out the current carbon footprint of Parish municipality activities and services.

  2. A report that sets out a programme of work that aims to deliver Parish activities and services with carbon neutrality by 2025-2030. This report to include indicative implications, in terms of carbon footprint, finance, workforce, legal and existing policies.

  3. A report that identifies what steps have been taken and those that are proposed by the Parish to:

I.take urgent steps to inform all parishioners and businesses in Grouville about the severity of the crisis; and

II.take urgent action to mobilise and support all parishioners and businesses in Grouville to create “the conditions in which bottom-up initiatives flourish and Islanders support each other to change their behaviour and adapt to lower carbon lifestyles as quickly as possible, but no later than 2025-2030.”



8. Timeframe


The Parish Assembly requested that the Constable present the report by the end of 2019. To achieve this, the following key dates / milestones have been identified:


Date

Content

16th September 2019

Establish working group, agree projects, project leads and status.

7th October 2019

Review projects and draft plan.

4th November 2019

Review projects & working group ‘sign off’ of Plan.

2nd December 2019

Present report to Parish Assembly.


9. Communications


The Constable’s Office will manage communications concerning the project and its progress. The Constable will lead on communication matters; other members are asked to refer all communications and media enquiries to the Constable. Communications and media releases will be included on the Working Group Agenda as necessary.

10. Resources


The project will be resourced by utilising existing staff within the parish and parishioners in the action working Group. Acknowledging that, in addition, some external expert advice may be needed.


Appendix D – Action Working Group 1 Output












Appendix E – Quick Wins Project Initiation Documents


Quick Wins Project – Domestic Use of Seaweed as a Fertiliser



Quick Wins Project – Locally Grown Food



Quick Wins Project – Planting Trees



Quick Wins Project – Beach Cleans, Lane Cleans & Adopt a Lane



Quick Wins Project – Food waste



Quick Wins Project – Mending & Fixing



Quick Wins Project – Website















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